Blood moon 2018

The world will experience a total lunar eclipse on July 27.

This is the going to be the longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century because the moon is at one of its furthest points from the Earth, making it to look smaller. Result of this more parts of its surface will be blacked out than which normally happens in an eclipse.

lunar eclipse 2018

A lunar eclipse phenomenon is when the moon moves on the opposite side of the earth to the sun. It will be then in the earth’s shadow.

 

During this kind of eclipse, the moon will eventually get darker but it won’t disappear into blackness altogether but it will turn into a coppery or reddish hue. This is popularly known as a blood moon.

What causes blood moon? what makes it to turn red during a lunar eclipse?

As we know the moon does not create any light of its own, rather shines because its surface reflects the sunlight.

During a total lunar eclipse, the Earth blocks the light coming from the sun which makes the surface of the moon look like a red or orange glow.

This is due to an effect called Rayleigh Scattering. This is the same factor responsible for redness in sunrise and sunsets and also making the sky look blue.

Rays of sunlight are sometimes bounced off course as they travel towards earth. Short wavelengths such as violet and blue are scattered when they hit the earths’s atmosphere, while longer wavelengths like red and orange pass the atmosphere and reach the Earth.

The red and orange light when entered is then refracted or bent around the Earth and hits the moon surface on the other side, giving it this blood colour.

which part of world will lunar eclipse be visible

According to astronomers the eclipse will be visible throughout most parts of Europe, Africa, western and central Asia, the Indian Ocean, and Western Australia. In the UK, it will be a good view of the lunar eclipse.

People in Birmingham first see the eclipse happening at 9pm on July 27, as the Earth’s shadow moves across the moon.

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